Protective Prevention Effects on the Association of Poverty With Brain Development

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Protective Prevention Effects on the Association of Poverty With Brain Development

In the first paper published from the CTAPS-sponsored Adversity, Inflammation, and the Brain pilot study, a team of CTAPS scientists found that participation in the Strong African American Families (SAAF) program at age 11 ameliorated the association between childhood poverty and brain development in early adulthood. Results, published in JAMA Pediatrics, indicate that years spent living in poverty during adolescence forecast diminished hippocampal and amygdalar volumes among young adults, but only among participants in the control condition; this associated was not evident among those who participated in SAAF. These findings contribute new information concerning the association between childhood poverty and limbic regions of the brain as well as the protective effects from family-centered prevention programming.

The full article can be accessed here.